New Apps For Parents That Check Baby’s Poop Colors and Prevents Teens From Texting While Driving

black-baby1

Baby Poop Color App

Johns Hopkins University gastroenterologists have developed a free app they believe will help provide quick diagnosis of the leading cause of liver failure in children.  You may find this funny, but many young mothers in the African American community have children affected by this.  And, many of them have smart phones more than they have adults or older relatives/friends who can advise them about this issue.

The app uses “color recognition software,” according to a news release from the university, that allows parents to compare photos of their child’s stool against normal colors for infant stool, in the hope of quickly catching the first signs of biliary atresia. The app also allows parents to send the photos to their pediatrician, and reminds them to conduct the color check every two weeks between birth and two months of age.

The disease, which causes bile to build up in the liver because the ducts that drain it are damaged or malformed, is the leading cause of liver failure in children and the most frequent reason kids require liver transplants. Ninety percent of infants treated within 60 days of birth with surgery to repair the ducts see their bile flow return to normal. But that figure drops to half if the procedure is done just two or three weeks later.

White or clay-colored stool is often the first sign of the disorder, which occurs in one of every 14,000 newborns in the United States. Yet parents are rarely told to watch the color of their newborn’s feces, and the average diagnosis does not come for 70 days, according to Hopkins.

The physicians have teamed with Procter & Gamble Baby Care to distribute a stool color guide at birthing centers. A similar program in Taiwan improved the five-year survival rate of the disease by a third.

Stool colors to be concerned about are black, red, white or pale yellow, according to the doctors. For a guide, go here. For one that is much more graphic, go here.

 

Teens-Penalties-can-deter-texting-at-wheel-OS25GHL6-x-large

Apps to Stop Texting While Driving

How would you like to control whether your teen can text and drive?

Many drivers, especially teenage drivers, know the dangers of texting while driving—yet they continue doing it. Now, there is an app that can control this behavior.

Luckily, recent technology has provided us with a way to completely stop drivers from texting while driving. There are now applications that can be downloaded through your smart phone that work with your GPS to shut off text messaging. Once your GPS picks up that you are moving faster than a certain speed, it shuts off the phone’s capabilities to text and call.

Here is a rundown of some of the most popular Apps (available for a small fee) to get your teen to stop texting while driving.

-iZUP — This app is one of the most restrictive. IZUP completely disables your phone except to dial 911 or one of three other pre-approved numbers.

-tXtblocker —  This software allows you to set time and location restrictions for texting or other cell phone use. A list of pre-approved numbers can also be dialed at anytime.

-CellSafety — This app disables your cell phone while you’re driving and can be set up to block text messages in certain “zones” such as school. There is a wide variety of parental controls and GPS tracking.

-Textecution— Once your GPS detects that you are moving faster than 10mph, it disables your texting. If you are a passenger, or riding a bus, you can ask for permission to text from the account administrator who would be able to override the software.

-Otter— Like the other apps, Otter offers the ability to disable phone capabilities when it detects the phone reaching a certain speed, with the option to send an automated text reply. The app also offers parent-enabled pass codes, and a manual mode that lets busy users quickly offer a preprogramed reply.

Young drivers represent the future of road safety.  And even though laws for texting while driving and using a cell phone differ from state to state, it’s always a good idea to encourage your teens to put the phone down while driving.

What do you think about these apps?

 

Search